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Classes Taught

This section details the classes that I have taught.  The First-Year Writing Seminars* are courses that I designed, and for which I was the primary instructor of record.  This list is ordered temporally, from most recent to least recent.

To see materials related to a specific class, click the inverted caret (  ) next to the course semester that you wish to examine in order to expand the course information.


Orbis Terrarum:  The Medieval Earth was a Globe
Cornell University, Ithaca NY 

  • Taught:  Spring, 2018
  • Description:  A First-Year Writing Seminar* in medieval history, focusing on the ways that medieval European people constructed their image of the world experientially.  This class takes as a starting point the modern perception that medieval people that the world was flat, and uses the 19th and 20th century creation of that myth to investigate the social power of historical interoperation.
  • Class Materials and Evaluations:
    • Spring, 2018   
      • materials forthcoming

The Britons’ Britain:  Constructing Medieval England
Cornell University, Ithaca NY


Writing 7100:  Teaching Writing
Cornell University, Ithaca NY

  • Taught:  Fall, 2015
  • Role:  Co-facilitator with a member of the Knight Institute Staff
  • Description:   This course prepares graduate instructors of Cornell’s First-Year Writing Seminars to teach courses that both introduce undergraduates to particular fields of study and help them develop writing skills they will need throughout their undergraduate careers. Seminar discussions and readings on pedagogical theories and practices provide an overview of the teaching of writing within a disciplinary context. Participants develop written assignments to be used in their own First-Year Writing Seminars.
  • Class Materials and Evaluations:

Where the World Ends:  Foundations of Medieval Geographies
Cornell University, Ithaca NY

  • Taught:  Fall, 2015
  • Description:  A First-Year Writing Seminar* in medieval history, focusing on the ways that theory and received knowledge influenced the ways that medieval European people imagined their world.  The class reads from the Bible, Plato’s Timaeus, Strabo, Eratosthenes, Macrobius, Isidore, and Bede, before considering how these theories of space and geography play out in medieval maps and in The Travels of Sir John Mandeville.
  • Class Materials and Evaluations:

Mapquest:  Space, Place, and Movement in Medieval Europe
Cornell University, Ithaca NY

  • Taught:  Fall, 2014 | Spring, 2015
  • Description: A First-Year Writing Seminar* in medieval history, focusing on the ways that medieval European people constructed their image of the world experientially.  The class takes Victor and Edith Turner’s concepts of liminality and communitas as framing mechanisms to examine medieval and modern pilgrimages, both as social phenomena and as literary events.  The class reads a number of pilgrim itineraries, spending the most time with William Weys’ journey to Jerusalem, and also reads The Travels of Sir John Mandeville and Marco Polo’s Travels.
  • Class Materials and Evaluations:

* The First-Year Writing Seminar (FWS) is a central part of Cornell University’s “Writing in the Disciplines” program. The purpose of these classes is to teach composition as it is practiced in the instructor’s field. FWS classes must spend close to half of in-class time on writing, have a limit of 75 pages per week on reading assignments, and require a minimum of five graded writing assignments per semester.

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